Thursday, 30 December 2010

Kafka and Freud (still rowing that boat)

At the point where Kafka and I were about to part company (which would have been a pain because he's part of my theories assignment) I realised something. Kafka has weird categories of people that pop up in his stories. OK, there are the powerless leads like Gregor Samsa and K. who just experience unfairness without resistance. But there are also women (a strange breed in Kafka, very often unclean, deformed and promiscuous). There are a lot of talking animals, who function better than the people. And 'happy' people, almost inhuman people, like the ones in The Next Village, who don;'t have to sleep because they don't get tired, and all the 'assistants' in his stories who seem to just run and run. They are almost angelic (if I can use such a religious term with Kafka), creatures created but not quite human, who are musical, tireless and contented. They are part of the system without being victimised by it. Interesting. So I'm coming at it from that angle. What is the nature of these characters in Kafka's world? Hmm. So I feel like I've got an 'in'.

Meanwhile, I'm playing with the book, because I had to do a workshop I handed in chapters 3 and 4 but actually, missed out an earlier chapter which I think can go back in. That means I'll have a good chunk ready to work on back in Winchester when I get back. I'm so enjoying being home in most respects, but I won't miss all the interruptions!   

3 comments:

  1. I know what you mean about interruptions. When do those interruptions go back to school?!

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  2. I thought it would get better as they got older but apparently not. I was interrupted by a chorus of 'Mummy, he ruined our game!' the other day. The players were 17, 19 and 20. The offener dropped his mobile on the 'Risk' board while he was texting his girlfriend...the college ones go back Wednesday, the university ones have another couple of weeks.

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  3. I wish I was smart enough to know more about Kafka. Just so I could say "well it was postively Kafkaesque"...

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